1940
Dolly Millender, ’41, Naomi Millender, ’67

Growing up the youngest of eight children, Dolly (Hood) Millender, ’41, remembers her parents’ constant preaching of the importance of education. The daughter of an entrepreneur father and civil rights activist mother, Millender came to Indiana State University with aspirations of becoming a librarian.

To the Hood family, going to college was an expectation. Their Sycamore dendrochronology-ish legacy began in the early 1900s. Their inspiring tale of a three-generation Indiana State family that spans all four institutional name changes earned the Hoods the 2014 Legacy Award. This award, presented by the Indiana State Alumni Association, recognizes multi-generational Indiana State families.

The Hood family heritage began with Millender’s aunts, Jessie Hood and Josephine Hood. The first women in their family to attend Indiana State Normal School, the sisters were only two of a few dozen African-American students at the institution during this time. Undeterred, they earned education degrees in pursuit of teaching careers.

Inspired by their aunts’ accomplishments and parents’ persistence, the second generation of the Hood family began their Indiana State Teachers College journey. Ruth (Hood) Battle, ’32, was the first in the family to attend the institution. A talented pianist, she won a contest and earned a $1,000 scholarship that covered all four years of tuition at the institution. She went on to a 35-year career as an English teacher at Gary Roosevelt High School in Gary, Ind. In her retirement, Ruth served as the president of the Indiana Retired Teachers Association.

Orestes Hood, ’37, was the first and only brother of the Hood family to earn an Indiana State degree. As a student, he was responsible for desegregating the university’s dining facility by orchestrating a “one-man sit-in” in the lunch room. The progressive event was successful and granted African-American students access to the same dining facility as white students.

Millender, who was attending Indiana State at the same time as Orestes, clearly remembers this day.

“I was too scared to sit down for lunch, but my brother — he didn’t care. He wanted to say that he sat down at lunch,” Millender said.

After graduating, Orestes became a well-known psychologist in California.

Like Ruth, Gladys (Hood) Johnson, ’42, attended Indiana State and earned her degree in education. Gladys served as the first African-American female principal in the Gary, Ind., school district.

Millender was the last of her eight siblings to attend Indiana State. She studied English, music appreciation and library science was involved with the student council. After graduating, she became a librarian and worked at several school libraries, as well as the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. In addition, Millender authored five children’s books, including biographies of Crispus Attucks, Louis Armstrong and Martin Luther King, Jr.

Millender’s daughter, Naomi Millender, ’67, followed in her footsteps by becoming a third generation Hood family member to attend Indiana State. As a Sycamore, Naomi was active in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and was one of four students who helped to start the Alpha Kappa Alpha chapter at Indiana State. Earning a bachelor’s degree in Radio/TV/Film, Naomi went on to become a successful educational consultant and later the director of the Follow Through Educational Projects.

“Indiana State was a fabulous education institution in those days, and that’s the reason it’s that way now – because it started that way,” Millender said.


1950
Dale McKee, ’57, and Family

The McKee family was honored as the 2013 recipient of the Legacy Award presented by the Indiana State University Alumni Association. Family members who were honored and are alumni of Indiana State include Clyde McKee, ’31, Dale McKee, ’57, GR ’60, Craig McKee, ’YR, Diane McKee, ’83, GR ’93, Beth McKee, ’83, and Chris McKee, ’87. Dale’s wife, Nancy, was also honored, as she is a prominent nursing faculty member at Indiana State.


1960
Dolly Millender, ’41, Naomi Millender, ’67

Growing up the youngest of eight children, Dolly (Hood) Millender, ’41, remembers her parents’ constant preaching of the importance of education. The daughter of an entrepreneur father and civil rights activist mother, Millender came to Indiana State University with aspirations of becoming a librarian.

To the Hood family, going to college was an expectation. Their Sycamore dendrochronology-ish legacy began in the early 1900s. Their inspiring tale of a three-generation Indiana State family that spans all four institutional name changes earned the Hoods the 2014 Legacy Award. This award, presented by the Indiana State Alumni Association, recognizes multi-generational Indiana State families.

The Hood family heritage began with Millender’s aunts, Jessie Hood and Josephine Hood. The first women in their family to attend Indiana State Normal School, the sisters were only two of a few dozen African-American students at the institution during this time. Undeterred, they earned education degrees in pursuit of teaching careers.

Inspired by their aunts’ accomplishments and parents’ persistence, the second generation of the Hood family began their Indiana State Teachers College journey. Ruth (Hood) Battle, ’32, was the first in the family to attend the institution. A talented pianist, she won a contest and earned a $1,000 scholarship that covered all four years of tuition at the institution. She went on to a 35-year career as an English teacher at Gary Roosevelt High School in Gary, Ind. In her retirement, Ruth served as the president of the Indiana Retired Teachers Association.

Orestes Hood, ’37, was the first and only brother of the Hood family to earn an Indiana State degree. As a student, he was responsible for desegregating the university’s dining facility by orchestrating a “one-man sit-in” in the lunch room. The progressive event was successful and granted African-American students access to the same dining facility as white students.

Millender, who was attending Indiana State at the same time as Orestes, clearly remembers this day.

“I was too scared to sit down for lunch, but my brother — he didn’t care. He wanted to say that he sat down at lunch,” Millender said.

After graduating, Orestes became a well-known psychologist in California.

Like Ruth, Gladys (Hood) Johnson, ’42, attended Indiana State and earned her degree in education. Gladys served as the first African-American female principal in the Gary, Ind., school district.

Millender was the last of her eight siblings to attend Indiana State. She studied English, music appreciation and library science was involved with the student council. After graduating, she became a librarian and worked at several school libraries, as well as the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. In addition, Millender authored five children’s books, including biographies of Crispus Attucks, Louis Armstrong and Martin Luther King, Jr.

Millender’s daughter, Naomi Millender, ’67, followed in her footsteps by becoming a third generation Hood family member to attend Indiana State. As a Sycamore, Naomi was active in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and was one of four students who helped to start the Alpha Kappa Alpha chapter at Indiana State. Earning a bachelor’s degree in Radio/TV/Film, Naomi went on to become a successful educational consultant and later the director of the Follow Through Educational Projects.

“Indiana State was a fabulous education institution in those days, and that’s the reason it’s that way now – because it started that way,” Millender said.

Connie Hamilton, ’65, GR ’67

Hamilton was honored by Duneland Schools as she retired from her 41-year teaching career.


1970s
Bill Lansaw, ’73

Lansaw was named vice president for transportation of LeSaint Logistics, a nationally recognized provider of warehousing, inventory control, transportation management and technology solutions, in Chicago.

Dave Kiley, ’73

Kiley retired from Cloverdale High School.

Tim Roth, ’76

Roth was inducted into the Indiana Hall of Fame by the National Football Foundation and the Indiana Football Coaches Association. Roth holds the record of all-time football wins at Winamac and was the head coach in the North-South All-Star Football game last year.

 


1980
Paul Coleman, ’80

Coleman has published his thirteenth book, “Finding Peace When Your Heart is in Pieces: A Step By Step Guide to the Other Side of Grief, Loss, and Pain.”

James Goecker, GR ’86

Goecker was named vice president for enrollment management and strategic communications at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in Terre Haute, IN.

Bart Colwell, ’87

Colwell was honored by the Crossroads of America Council, Boy Scouts of America in Terre Haute, IN.


1990
Danielle Bruce, ’97, GR ’98

Bruce is painting a new mural funded by Brazil Main Street, a nonprofit organization, to promote the downtown atmosphere in Brazil, Indiana.

Maya Stewart, ’96

Stewart was promoted to vice president of Old National Bank’s Financial Center.

 

Ann Ryan, GR ’91

Ryan was promoted to chief marketing officer for Old National Bancorp.

 


2000
Glenn Puit, ’02

Puit has been named editor of the News-Capital newspaper in McAlister, Oklahoma.

Jennifer McCormick, EdS ’08, PhD ’12

McCormick has been appointed to the board of trustees for the East Central Region of Ivy Tech Community College.

Deanna King, GR ’03, PhD ’03

King has been named vice-chancellor for Ivy Tech Community College Southwest in Evansville, IN.


2010
Riley Nungester, ’13

Nungester is one of the new troopers assigned to the Indiana State Police Post in Bloomington, IN.

Andrea Baysinger, ’14

Baysinger has joined Putnam Pediatrics and Internal Medicine as a family nurse practitioner in Greencastle, IN.

Thomas Hardesty, ’12

Hardesty is the new sports editor for the Paris Beacon-News in Paris, Illinois.